Have a read of our top tips to keep you safe in Argentina

For those hesitant to visit Argentina due to safety concerns, we firmly believe these worries should not stop you. Argentina is generally a safe country to visit as a tourist. Whilst there are higher risks of theft and petty crime, if you take the proper precautions, you should be completely fine.

Argentina is incredibly diverse, encompassing vast rural landscapes with little to no human threat, and bustling cities with a slightly higher risk. Traversing these intriguing regions and discovering the country’s compelling cultural and natural heritage produces a safe experience. However, it is important to travel mindfully, especially in certain areas. For example, safety in Buenos Aires should be measured differently from that in El Chaltén.

Follow our guidelines below to ensure you avoid harm’s way and speak to a Wayfairer Travel Specialist for any further travel advice for Argentina. Make sure to read up on government guidelines before travelling to Argentina or any country, as there is no disadvantage to being a prudent tourist.

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Why Travel to Argentina?

A wealth of experiences awaits you as you travel to Argentina. For example, vast Pampas grasslands dotted with cosy estancias encourage you to indulge in a warming asado. Intrepid travellers gather in Argentina’s dramatic mountain landscapes, seeking the majesty of the Andes or the glittering lakes of Tierra del Fuego National Park.

Argentinian culture also seeps from all its corners, imprinted on the rolling winelands of Mendoza, its elegant lodges championing the bounty of their surrounding vineyards. Encounter the thriving melting pot of cultures in Buenos Aires, where Argentina’s soul is palpable.

A trip to Argentina may encompass more than you could imagine, offering an enticing amalgamation of urban modernity and pristine natural settings. A fantastic array of luxury and responsible estancias, hotels and lodges embrace Argentina’s beauty, inviting you to join them celebrating of the country’s boundless spirit.

Discover your perfect luxury holiday in Argentina here:

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Is Argentina Safe To Visit?

Crime in Argentina

Theft and pickpocketing are common in Argentina, typically targeting tourists in busy areas. Be vigilant, especially in Argentina’s busiest cities like Buenos Aires and Mendoza. Avoid bringing all your valuables out with you so that you don’t find yourself completely stuck following an incident. It is best to leave your passport somewhere safe inside, but keep a scanned copy if this isn’t possible.

Thieves in Argentina are renowned for using certain techniques and tricks. Sometimes, they travel on motorbikes, snatching people’s bags along the way, so keep your bag firmly attached to you in any way you can – perhaps use a bum bag. Some are also known for using distraction techniques, working in pairs or groups and putting on a friendly act, so they firmly refuse any suspicious approaches from strangers.

A specific scam threatens those travelling to Buenos Aires, Argentina’s lively capital city. It is aptly named the “mustard scam”, as the thief and their accomplice will pretend to spray mustard on their victim before offering to clean them up. Of course, this gives the thief time to act. Remain wary of unexpected interactions and ask your local guide for further information during travel.

Terrorism in Argentina is generally not of high risk; however, it is still important to remain vigilant wherever you are. Ensure you have all numbers for emergency services on your phone in case of suspicious activity, especially in busy areas, large crowds, or public transport.

  • General Emergency Number: 911
  • Police Department: 101 – a 24-hour helpline for tourists can be accessed by dialling this number.
  • Ambulance: 107
  • Fire: 100

For more information about emergency services in Argentina and accessing the help you need, read here

 

Cultural Differences

When travelling abroad, it is important to check on any differences between your culture and the one you are a guest of. You should avoid bringing up controversial topics about politics or history, generally remaining discreet and non-obnoxious. For example, discussions of the Falklands War should be vigilantly avoided, referring to the Falklands Islands as Las Islas Malvinas is respectful.

For LGBTQ+ people travelling to Argentina, there is no need to be cautious or act any differently than at home. Argentina is generally accepting. It was the first South American nation to legalise same-sex marriage. Buenos Aires has an especially vibrant gay scene, and its LGBTQ+ community celebrates this each year in November during the Buenos Aires Gay Pride Parade.

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Locals Laws and Politics

Educate yourself on the laws of a country before visiting, as you never know how divergent they could be from your home country. Prison sentences differ from those elsewhere, coming down especially harsh on drug-related crime, so ensure you stay clear of any involvement in illegal drugs. Always be polite to the police, carrying a photo ID with you in case you are questioned.

During your trip to Argentina, keep up-to-date with local news so that you can plan around any political unrest or demonstrations. If your trip collides with any large political demonstrations or protests, it is essential to avoid involvement, even if you are passionate about the subject. It is difficult to predict whether a protest will remain peaceful, plus making bold, political statements abroad can make you a target for those who disagree. Research important political dates and events to avoid protests and demonstrations.

 

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Advice for Women Travelling to Argentina 

As usual, when travelling as a woman, one of the first things you’ll ask is “is Argentina safe to visit”?

It is always a good idea to reflect on your safety when travelling to Argentina as a woman, especially if alone, taking precautions and keeping in touch with loved ones. Whilst locals are generally very friendly in Argentina, you never know who you will bump into whilst out and about.

Avoid travelling alone at night, especially in quieter areas. Only take radio taxis, which are very easy to identify, massively reducing the risk of harassment. If you wish to seek Argentina’s nightlife, be wary of strangers and the possibility of spiking and stick to the busier neighbourhoods.

As well as this, even in daylight, women are a more popular target for thieves, too, so act firmly and politely against unwanted interactions with strangers.

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Dial 101 to access the 24-hour police helpline (in English) for tourists if you encounter any trouble.

You can find further advice for women travelling abroad here

For those hesitant to visit Argentina due to safety concerns, we firmly believe these worries should not stop you. Argentina is generally a safe country to visit as a tourist. Whilst there are higher risks of theft and petty crime, if you take the proper precautions, you should be completely fine.

Argentina is incredibly diverse, encompassing vast rural landscapes with little to no human threat, and bustling cities with a slightly higher risk. Traversing these intriguing regions and discovering the country’s compelling cultural and natural heritage produces a safe experience. However, it is important to travel mindfully, especially in certain areas. For example, safety in Buenos Aires should be measured differently from that in El Chaltén.

Follow our guidelines below to ensure you avoid harm’s way and speak to a Wayfairer Travel Specialist for any further travel advice for Argentina. Make sure to read up on government guidelines before travelling to Argentina or any country, as there is no disadvantage to being a prudent tourist.

Talk to a Wayfairer Travel Specialist and discover your perfect holiday in Argentina

 

We understand that booking trips, especially adventurous and alternative ones such as this can be intimidating, so get in touch; we can take the stress out of your holiday planning and organise a trip you won’t forget!

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