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Namibia

January Overview

January is mid-summer in Namibia. It tends to be very hot and humid, with temperatures hitting 30°C to 35°C and up to 40°C in the desert.

If you’re planning to visit Etosha National Park in northern Namibia, you should bear in mind that this is the rainy season and torrential downpours are likely, however these usually occur in the afternoons so it is still possible to enjoy morning or early evening game drives. The landscape is lush and beautiful at this time of year, however game viewing is sometimes more difficult because the animals disperse due to the large amount of surface water so you won’t find large concentrations of wildlife congregating around waterholes.

Coastal areas, surrounding Swakopmund, are drier and less humid than other areas of Namibia.

July Overview

July is one of the driest and coolest months. Although the day time temperatures are still warm, the nights can become very cold, dropping below freezing in some desert areas, so you’ll need to pack plenty of warm clothes.

The green that covered parts of the desert earlier in the year is now gone and the landscape becomes dry and arid again. As the landscape dries high concentrations of wildlife congregate around waterholes, providing excellent game viewing opportunities.  

Southern right, humpback and Minke whales pass by the Namibian coast from July-November, with most sightings taking place in October and November. The best place to see them is Walvis Bay which is located 30 kilometres south of Swakopmund.

September Overview

By September it warms up again with daytime temperatures averaging at 29°C across the country. It isn't yet too hot and the humidity is still low, keeping it very pleasant.

Game viewing in most areas is excellent, although there's often a lot of dust around and the vegetation has lost its vibrancy. Wildlife still gathers by waterholes, often in large numbers, in the wildlife parks of Etosha and the Ongava Reserve.

Southern right, humpback and Minke whales pass by the Namibian coast from July-November, with most sightings taking place in October and November. The best place to see them is Walvis Bay which is located 30 kilometres south of Swakopmund.

October Overview

October is the last month of Namibia’s dry winter. The weather is getting warmer, and the precipitation is increasing, although with an average of 12mm of rain this month, it will not impact your safari at all. Skies are generally still clear making it perfect for star-gazing.

Vegetation is scarce which means that wildlife doesn’t have much in the way of options for cover, making it easier to view. You should bear in mind that the increasing temperatures in September and October and the lack of water, means that there is more dust which is particularly evident on your game drives.

Southern right, humpback and Minke whales pass by the Namibian coast from July-November, with most sightings taking place in October and November. The best place to see them is Walvis Bay which is located 30 kilometres south of Swakopmund.

 If you’re visiting Windhoek in October you can join the Oktoberfest celebrations. Namibia's German community comes together to celebrate in true Bavarian style - complete with lederhosen, bratwurst, oompah bands... and plenty of beer.

November Overview

November is quite an unpredictable month. On some days it can be hot and sunny with clear skies, whilst on other days the sky will fill with clouds and threaten to rain and you may even experience a spectacular thunderstorm or two. Witnessing the first rain of the season is an unforgettable and exciting event!

November-February is the best time to see flocks of flamingos in Swakopmund, where they gather on lagoons in their thousands.

Southern right, Humpback and Minke whales pass by the Namibian coast from July-November, with most sightings taking place in October and November. The best place to see them is Walvis Bay which is located 30 kilometres south of Swakopmund.

December Overview

This is now the summer in Namibia and temperatures increase. Mornings will have clear blue cloudless skies, and then as the afternoon draws in so do the clouds. Heavy rain often follows, clearing the skies again for the early evening which means you’ll get cloudless nights - perfect for watching the stars. 

As the rainfall increases, landscapes begin to thrive and there is more vegetation. Most animals are born at the start of the rainy season, when food is plentiful and life is relatively easy so December is a great time to go to Namibia if you want to see newborn wildlife.

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